Archive for the 'health care' Category

The dangers of “Fight Club”… someone might actually break a spine?

Ok, so it has been some time since I last posted on Broken Spines but it is with good reason.  Just over ten weeks ago I actually broke my spine… I woke up to sure agony.  I thought I had pulled a muscle in my neck/back and waited it out over night.  The next morning the pain was still there and I made an appointment to see my doctor and a chiropractor and a colleagues suggestion.  The chiropractor proceeded to tell me how messed up my neck/back was and gave me an alignment adjustment with no improvement.  My doctor saw me and thought that it was a pulled muscle and prescribed muscle relaxers and Vicodin.  After a week on the drugs, more chiropractic “help” and even acupuncture I was without sleep and still in excruciating pain (so much so that on some nights I honestly would have preferred amputation).  Talking with friends and colleagues I was convinced that I needed to see a specialist.  I called the recommended neck & back specialist the next morning and was told that I needed a referral from my primary doctor and an MRI before the he would see me.  I  called my primary doctor and after some pleading I was able to get an appointment the next day.  My doctor ordered x-rays, did an exam, and agreed to give me the referral and MRI request.  At the scheduling area for the MRI I was told that there was a mobile unit that came to the clinic on Mondays and Thursdays… and of course today was Tuesday – I had to make it clear to the scheduler that Thursday was not soon enough.  Sure enough there was one at a local hospital and their MRI was available that evening.  After the most painful 30 minutes in an MRI machine I get to go home and wait until the next morning for the results.  In the meantime, I called the specialist back and told his staff that I my referral and my MRI – how soon could they get me in?  The answer – three weeks!  I wasn’t going to last three more weeks with this pain and lack of sleep!  I explained that to the scheduler and she suggested that I leave a message with the doctor’s assistant and they would get back to me.  I decided to pull out all of the stops and left the voicemail informing them that my neighbor worked with the specialist, two other neighbors had seen the doctor and one had surgery with him, and that I was in EXCRUCIATING pain.  What do you know… they found room for me within seven days.  The next morning the MRI report was available online and I come to find out that I had herniated a disc in my neck/spine: C6-C7.  I meet with the specialist the next week and after three weeks of the most excruciating pain I have ever felt (even with the aid of the finest narcotics man has made) I was finally prescribed oral steroids (a.k.a. Prednisone).  Within hours the amazing anti-inflammatory medicine in Prednisone had started kicking in and the pain was almost gone.  The only lingering effect was numbness or tingling in my first two fingers of the my left arm.  I proceeded with six weeks of physical therapy which helped strengthen my neck and arm but still left the numbness.  The only problem now was the persistent numbness… my specialist suggested that I did not want it to go beyond 12 weeks or I could risk permanent nerve damage.  Last week was week 10 and I decided to proceed with surgery to remove the herniated portion of the disc that was causing the pressure on the nerve (posterior microdiscectomy)… five days in and still waiting for a final verdict if the numbness has gone away for good.  I’ll keep you posted…

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Conspicuous Consumerism

conspicuous-consumersm.jpgconspicuous-consumersm.jpgconspicuous-consumersm.jpgconspicuous-consumersm.jpgconspicuous-consumersm.jpgNorwegian American economist and sociologist Thorstein Veblen coined the term “conspicuous consumption” in his 1899 book The Theory of the Leisure Class.  Conspicuous consumption has been discussed in the context of addictive or narcissistic behaviors induced by consumerism, the desire for immediate gratification, and hedonic expectations. 

Our friend Jared Diamond recently wrote a piece in the NYT about American’s “Consumption Factor” (which is 32 times that of Kenya and 11 times China).  He writes: 

If India as well as China were to catch up, world consumption rates would triple. If the whole developing world were suddenly to catch up, world rates would increase elevenfold. It would be as if the world population ballooned to 72 billion people (retaining present consumption rates).

So what is it that we are so conspicuously consuming?

Globally, the 20% of the world’s people in the highest-income countries account for 86% of total private consumption expenditures — the poorest 20% a minuscule 1.3%. More specifically, the richest fifth:

  • Consume 45% of all meat and fish, the poorest fifth 5%
  • Consume 58% of total energy, the poorest fifth less than 4%
  • Have 74% of all telephone lines, the poorest fifth 1.5%
  • Consume 84% of all paper, the poorest fifth 1.1%
  • Own 87% of the world’s vehicle fleet, the poorest fifth less than 1%

Global Priority $U.S. Billions
Cosmetics in the United States 8
Ice cream in Europe 11
Perfumes in Europe and the United States 12
Pet foods in Europe and the United States 17
Business entertainment in Japan 35
Cigarettes in Europe 50
Alcoholic drinks in Europe 105
Narcotics drugs in the world 400
Military spending in the world 780

And compare that to what was estimated as additional costs to achieve universal access to basic social services in all developing countries:

Global Priority $U.S. Billions
Basic education for all 6
Water and sanitation for all 9
Reproductive health for all women 12
Basic health and nutrition 13

(Source: The state of human development, United National Development Report 1998, Chapter 1, p.37)
Other sources:
Data from the World Bank for 2003
http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Consumption.asp


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